How technology compresses everything: Three unthinkable outcomes that can benefit man

How technology compresses everything: Three unthinkable outcomes that can benefit man

When man first conquered the moon, NASA was equipped with the most sophisticated computer equipment of its time to launch the first manned missions to space. There were tons of equipment occupying almost an entire office building of wires, circuit boards, and hardware to harness the technology. Decades later, the same amount of technology multiplied dozens of times can be made to fit inside a regular smartphone. That is how technology has evolved since then and the same goes for microscopic to nano-technology. Nowadays, automated and off-site managed service provider VA could run an entire software and hardware infrastructure for a business more advanced than the technology available in the early days of space missions. As time goes by technology follows suit to make devices much smaller, yet more powerful.…
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Velocity–Web Operations

I was really impressed with the Velocity conference, the organization, the content and the participants. The conference was a perfect size, not too big while at the same time not too small. Velocity had two main themes, Web Performance & Optimization and Web Operations. Common topic of discussion were performance, operations, change management, configuration management, monitoring, optimization, metrics, mobile, devops, web ops, agility, JavaScript, node.js, and dirty-apps (data intensive real time apps). I gravitated to the web operations talks but also sat in on some of the mobile and web optimization discussions. I heard multiple times was how web performance and optimization has grown and really delivered value over the past five years, whereas the web operations sector has not grown at the same rate. From a web optimization perspective,…
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The Open Social Web

I have been talking and writing about web 2.0, the open web, social networking, and social computing for a while now and now like to refer to all of this as The Open Social Web. In my version of the Open Social Web, all applications and content are built on open web standards that provide users with interoperability and control of their own data. While that may not be the case with many of the larger social networking sites, I like to think of it as a good goal to work towards. Adoption of social tools and applications have moved the digital conversation from blogs to social sites like Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter, Buzz and Identi.ca, and the adoption of free mobile tools has helped to fuel this migration. While many…
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Thoughts on Facebook

Thoughts on Facebook

In November of 2009, I read The Accidental Billionaires by Ben Mezrich which was a story the Founding of Facebook and my impression based on the book was that Facebook’s founder Marc Zuckerberg screwed everyone on his way to building Facebook. I have recently just finished reading  The Facebook Effect by David Kirkpatrick and I have a different opinion of Marc Zuckerberg. Now I think he showed a lot of maturity and poise as he and the Facebook team met the challenges of growing and scaling Facebook into a network of over 500 million users, and I do not think that he screwed anyone. I do not think that the lawsuit filed against Marc Zuckerberg by Harvard students Cameron Winklevoss, Tyler Winklevoss, and Divya Narendra held much merit as Zuckerberg did not sign a contract with…
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Virtualization and the path to the Cloud

Virtualization and the path to the Cloud

Have you noticed the shift in hype within computing news away from cloud computing? I have and I think this is great because the hype tends to distort the facts. Also, while the hype is fading, adoption of cloud computing continues to grow and is predicted to grow. Ryan Nichols published a story in Computerworld in August 2010 called “Cloud computing by the numbers: What do all the statistics mean?” where he outlined statistics from IDC, Gartner and Merrill Lynch all estimating dramatic increases in cloud computing adoption. Also in August of 2010, Andre R Hickey from ChannelWeb outlined a story on Small and Medium Business (SMB) spending on Cloud Computing sighting research from AMI partners that where they predict cloud computing adoption by SMB’s to exceed $95 billion by…
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Google Buzz

Have you tried Google Buzz yet? I have and I like it a lot. It has many of the discussion and “follow” like features of Twitter, however unlike Twitter, you can see both sides of the conversation. Also, after using it for about two weeks there appears to be more technical content, links and discussions and fewer posts about going to lunch or what you had for dinner. Granted, I follow a lot of tech folks so it’s not surprising that I would see a lot of tech content, however this appears to be an easier solution than Twitter, Identi.ca or RSS for searching and for following what others say about a post or topic. It takes the discovery and follow aspects of Microblogging and the full commenting aspects or…
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The Open Web and Mozilla Drumbeat

I believe in and support the Open Web the Open Internet and the Mozilla Drumbeat Project. In my opinion, Openness leads to innovation and innovation leads to progress and progress is good for us all. For many non-technical folks, there is a subtle confusion between the Web and the Internet, so an easy way to think about the difference is to think about our roads and highways and think of them as the Internet. This is the Infrastructure that we use every day and do not even think about, just like the Internet. The web, on the other hand, is like the cars and trucks that use our roads. Compare a car to a Browser or a Web Site that rides on top of the road and on top of the Internet. The power of…
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Seven Technology Predictions for 2010

For the last few years I have been trying to identify the trends and directions of the Technology industry so I thought I would try again and make some predictions for 2010. You can read about my 2009 predictions here which were close with a few misses. Four of my predictions from last years are still high on my list for this year however the order has shifted in my mind. Here are my predictions 2010: 1) The Social Web There is a lot of hype and a lot of work around introducing social tools and communities into our daily life. The majority of these tools are delivered via the web in communities like Facebook, Twitter, Identi.ca, Plaxo, and Friendfeed. Google also has a stake in this game with OpenSocial,…
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Google’s Meaning of Open

Jonathan Rosenberg, Senior Vice President, Product Management at Google sent a long essay to the Google Product Managers and Engineers in an effort to put some clarity around the meaning of “Open” at Google. The well-written essay called “The Meaning of Open” ended up on the Google blog and is well worth reading. Jonathan outlines Open at Google as ….. There are two components to our definition of open: open technology and open information. Open technology includes open source, meaning we release and actively support code that helps grow the Internet, and open standards, meaning we adhere to accepted standards and, if none exist, work to create standards that improve the entire Internet (and not just benefit Google). Open information means that when we have information about users we use…
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CloudCamp Boston – Security and Private Clouds

I spent the second half of my day at Cloud Camp Boston which is a great unconference for those folks looking to learn more about cloud computing. I really like the unconference format which has grown in popularity from many podcamps and barcamps. This conference was moderated by David Nielsen @davenielsen who did a great job keeping the conversations flowing and everything else moving forward. There were three main sections to this cloud came 5 Minute Lightning Rounds – Mostly by Vendors 10 Questions identified by the attendees and answered by attendees with experience in the cloud 2 45 minute breakout sessions informally voted on by the attendees The Lightning Rounds were good, the 10 questions were better, however, the best part of the evening was the two breakout sessions that I attended. I…
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